Categories Archives: The Problem: Civilization

Dow and Monsanto Set to Team Up to Reintroduce Agent Orange Pesticide in the MidWest

from http://earthfirstnews.wordpress.com/

Cross Posted from Op Ed News

In a match that some would say was made in hell, the nation’s two leading producers of agro-chemicals have joined forces in a partnership to reintroduce the use of the herbicide 2, 4-D, one half of the infamous defoliant Agent Orange, which was used by American forces to clear jungle during the Vietnam War. These two biotech giants have developed a weed management program that, if successful, would go a long way toward a predicted doubling of harmful herbicide use in America’s corn belt during the next decade.

The problem for corn farmers is that “superweeds” have been developing resistance to America’s best-selling herbicide Roundup, which is being sprayed on millions of acres in the Midwest and elsewhere. Dow Agrosciences has developed a strain of corn that it says will solve the problem. The new genetically modified variety can tolerate 2, 4-D, which will kill off the Roundup resistant weeds, but leave the corn standing. Farmers who opt into this system will be required to double-dose their fields with a deadly cocktail of Roundup plus 2, 4-D, both of which are manufactured by Monsanto. Continue reading

Ready, Set, Destroy – Walker Looks to Violate Treaties

from http://www.politiscoop.com/

Scott Walker Breaking Tribal Treaties

Madison – In a release today, the blog Cognidissidence posted what it dubbed as a secret email to Gov. Scott Walker from Walker staffer Andrew Davis. The email depicts talking points Walker will use to justify the breaking of treaties with tribes in Northern Wisconsin by opening their lands up to iron ore mining.

To give you a brief history, The Ojibwe of Wisconsin signed three major land cession treaties with the United States in 1837, 1842, and 1854, ceding their entire homeland to the U.S. and establishing reservations for four Ojibwe bands in the state. The 1837 land cession treaty between the United States and the Ojibwe was concluded at a conference held near present-day Minneapolis-St. Paul in Minnesota.

There, the Ojibwe traded the majority of their Wisconsin lands for a twenty-year annuity of $9500 in cash, $19,000 in goods (blankets, rifles, and cooking utensils), $2000 worth of provisions, $3000 to establish and maintain three blacksmiths’ shops, and $500 worth of tobacco. Congress appropriated another $75,000 to pay debts the tribe owed to fur traders. A final treaty provision reserved the Ojibwe’s right to hunt, fish, and gather wild rice on ceded lands.

More, President Obama Promised Tribal Leaders Help with environmental issues in November 2009 when he signed a memorandum directing every Cabinet agency to give him a detailed plan within 90 days of how they will implement an executive order signed by President Bill Clinton nine years ago that established “regular and meaningful consultation and collaboration” between tribal nations and the federal government.

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Wisconsin Wetlands Association: “No” to SB 368

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: February 15, 2012

Wisconsin Wetlands Association Statement on Passage of SB 368

Today is a sad day for wetlands in Wisconsin. Our strong tradition of allowing economic development while also maintaining a strong commitment to protecting wetlands has just been overturned by the Senate. Once revered nationwide for our high standards, our policies are sinking to the level of so many other states where thousands of acres of wetlands are legally destroyed each year and mitigation rarely lives up to its promise. Only time will tell whether this law, once enacted, will lead to the run on wetlands we fear. The new framework, emphasizing wetland mitigation over avoidance and minimization of wetland impacts, certainly allows it. To those who applaud this bill as an economic engine for the state of Wisconsin we remind you that wetlands contribute billions in free services to Wisconsin’s economy every year. They protect us from floods, support our fish and wildlife, clean our water, and preserve the outdoor heritage Wisconsin residents hold so dear. If this law is enacted, we will no longer be able to count on the state to protect our wetlands. Our focus moving forward will be to work with local communities, and others, to help them capitalize on the economic benefits of protecting and restoring wetlands. For better or worse, wetland protection will now be in the hands of the people.

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Jet Fuel Leaks Into Area Rivers

February 3, 2012

UPDATE: Shell has responded with a list of Community Information FAQ’s.  They are attached below.

*If you require more information on this issue contact the Milwaukee pipline community information line at: 1-866-467-4775.

Milwaukee Riverkeeper has been monitoring the estimated 9,000 gallon jet fuel leak from a Shell Oil Company pipeline along the eastern border of Mitchell International Airport, which discharged jet fuel into Wilson Park Creek and the Kinnickinnic River for OVER A WEEK in late January before the pipeline was shut down.

Teams of responders have been working around the clock to contain the spill, placing floating booms along the creek and river to contain the spread of the fuel and using vacuum trucks to skim fuel from the surface of the waterways.  They report the fuel has not reached Lake Michigan.

Riverkeeper has spoken to several informants that intimated the condition of the pipeline has been bad for a long time, but airport officials did not address it because it would have required shutting down the north-south runway (which has now been shut down to localize and repair the leak).

We will continue to monitor the situation and investigate legal options for rectifying the damage to our rivers.

For more information see the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel article and the report fromWISN Channel 12.

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ShellOilFactSheet.pdf 51.13 KB

Walker Favors Wolf Hunters over Native Rights

from http://www.progressive.org/

By Rebecca Kemble, February 2, 2012

Last Thursday, Anishinaabe elder Joe Rose of the Bad River Band addressed a press conference at the WI State Capitol. He traveled 250 miles from the shores of Lake Superior to protest the passage of a highly controversial mining bill that opens the door to a huge, open pit mine project that will likely destroy the entire Bad River watershed and the vast wild rice beds that grow within it.

Rose gave a short lecture on the creation story and history of his people in the region. He highlighted the relationship between wolves (Ma’iingan) and people in the Anishinaabe creation story. The two were created as brothers and traveled together all over the Earth, giving names to everything. The Creator then sent them on their separate ways, but told them that whatever happened to one would happen to the other.

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A New Declaration

from http://www.occupiedmedia.us/

by DERRICK JENSEN on Feb 1, 2012 • 5:43 pm

We hold these truths to be self-evident:

Photo: www.bethanybond.com

That the real, physical world is the source of our own lives, and the lives of others. A weakened planet is less capable of supporting life, human or otherwise.

Thus the health of the real world is primary, more important than any social or economic system, because all social or economic systems are dependent upon a living planet.

It is self-evident that to value a social system that harms the planet’s capacity to support life over life itself is to be out of touch with physical reality.

That any way of life based on the use of nonrenewable resources is by definition not sustainable.

That any way of life based on the hyper-exploitation of renewable resources is by definition not sustainable: if, for example, fewer salmon return every year, eventually there will be none. This means that for a way of life to be sustainable, it must not harm native communities: native prairies, native forests, native fisheries, and so on.

That the real world is interdependent, such that harm done to rivers harms those humans and nonhumans whose lives depend on these rivers, harms forests and prairies and wetlands surrounding these rivers, harms the oceans into which these rivers flow. Harm done to mountains harms the rivers flowing through them. Harm done to oceans harms everyone directly or indirectly connected to them.

That you cannot argue with physics. If you burn carbon-based fuels, this carbon will go into the air, and have effects in the real world.

That creating and releasing poisons into the world will poison humans and nonhumans.

That no one, no matter how rich or powerful, should be allowed to create poisons for which there is no antidote.

That no one, no matter how rich or powerful, should be allowed to create messes that cannot be cleaned up.

That no one, no matter how rich or powerful, should be allowed to destroy places humans or nonhumans need to survive.

That no one, no matter how rich or powerful, should be allowed to drive human cultures or nonhuman species extinct.

That reality trumps all belief systems: what you believe is not nearly so important as what is real.

That on a finite planet you cannot have an economy based on or requiring growth. At least you cannot have one and expect to either have a planet or a future.

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Menominee Seventh Grader Suspended for Saying “I Love You” in her Native Language

from http://www.nativenewsnetwork.com/

Miranda Washinawatok, Menominee

SHAWANO, WISCONSIN – What’s love got to do with it? Not much, especially if you say the words “I love you” in the Menominee language in front of a certain Wisconsin teacher.

Seventh grader Miranda Washinawatok, Menominee, found this out.

Miranda speaks two languages: Menominee and English. She also plays on her basketball team. However, two Thursdays ago she was suspended for one basketball game because she spoke Menominee to a fellow classmate during class.

Miranda attends Sacred Heart Catholic Academy in Shawano, Wisconsin. The school body is over 60 percent American Indian. The school is approximately six miles from the south border of the Menominee Indian Tribe Reservation.

“On January 19 I was told by Miranda she was being benched from playing that night. I found out at 4:20 and we were back at school at 6:30 pm so I could get to the bottom of why she could not play,”

said Tanaes Washinawatok, Miranda’s mother.

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DGR Wisconsin participates in anti-mining protest

from http://ashlandcurrent.com

Citizens from around the state are planning to protest the proposed Assembly iron mining bill Wednesday and Thursday, according to the Wisconsin Network for Peace and Justice.

A “Bury the Bill” rally will take place on Wednesday at 5 p.m. at the State Capitol on the State Street steps.

Then, Thursday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., a “People’s Tribunal” will take place in the north hearing room of the Capitol building’s second floor.

The Wednesday rally will feature speakers including Wisconsin Democracy Campaign Director Mike McCabe, Laura Gauger of the Wisconsin Resources Protection Council, Ben Manski of Wisconsin Wave, and attorney Glenn Reynolds. Photos and maps of the area around the proposed open-pit iron mine in Ashland and Iron Counties will be available for public viewing, and a short performance will demonstrate the impacts the bill could have on the Northwoods.

At the Thursday tribunal, anyone who wants to speak publicly will be invited to speak about the proposed legislation and mining in general.

The Wednesday protest and Thursday Tribunal are hosted by Madison for the Penokees. Participating organizations include the Penokee Hills Education Project, Mining Impact Coalition of Wisconsin, Wisconsin Network for Peace and Justice, SaveTheWatersEdge.com, Wisconsin Democracy Campaign, Sierra Club, Wisconsin Resources Protection Council, Midwest Environmental Advocates, Madison Infoshop, Family Farm Defenders, Take Back the Land-Madison, Groundwork White Anti-Racist Collective, Deep Green Resistance–Wisconsin, Lake Superior Greens, Madison-area Urban Ministry, and People Empowered to Protect the Land of Rosendale.

From Endangered To Problem: Wisconsin Wolf Hunt To Begin Next Week, Minnesota Set To Host Its Own Hunt

from the Earth First! Journal Editorial Collective

Following the removal of wolves from the federal endangered species list last month, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has announced that some residents will be able to hunt “problem” wolves by next week.  In little over a month the grey wolf’s designation in Wisconsin has moved from endangered to problem. The demonization and execution of the species is set to follow because of the risk wolves pose to the “property” of large landowners.

Permits will be issued starting Friday for landowners who claim that wolves have killed their livestock.

Also on Friday, residents will be allowed to shoot, without a permit, any wolf attacking personal property.

It is anticipated that any property owner killing a wild wolf for attacking their personal property will be visited by bipedel friends of the wolves in the night and their personal property will be further and more completely destroyed in retaliation.

Minnesota has also promised a wolf hunt, although nothing is set up.

No Justice—Or Future—in an Industrial Economy

A letter to the national Occupy Wall Street Movement, written by a member of Deep Green Resistance Austin, reminding us of a fundamental premise for any movement seeking a brighter future.

from: http://theplanetfeedsus.wordpress.com

an open letter to the national Occupy Wall Street movement

Dearest Occupy ::

I write y’all with the greatest admiration, excitement, hope, and humility.

I write with the intention to contribute to the conversations that people are having nationally – and internationally – about what the building of a just and sustainable world would look like.

I know these conversations have been going on for a very long time – longer than I can imagine – and that they did not begin with this movement and will not end with it, either. I know I’m not the only one with the content of this letter on their mind. I write from Austin, Texas, from occupied Tonkawa and Apache territories, and what I know of the other general assemblies and convergences comes through the Internet. I know I’m not privy to the majority of the conversations being had. But while trying to follow what people are calling for in this movement I’ve yet to see stated clearly what I consider to be a very important piece of the puzzle. Please know that I write this from a place of humility and respect, and in the spirit of dialogue for change.

I do not believe that there is hope for justice or a livable planet if the industrial economy continues. I do not believe any reform or technological innovation we have or could think of – even if realized on a massive, global scale – will prevent the destruction of the planet and the communities that are its breath and life. I believe the keys to deep green democracies and to a sustainable and just future are many – but that none of them are possible so long as industrialism continues. In the face of ecological collapse, global warming, and peak oil, any further growth of the global economy – including the U.S. economy – will only worsen the problem.

I believe that our challenge must not be to create more jobs or to grow the economy – but to physically pull apart the infrastructure of the powerful while creating local economies grounded in livelihoods outside the money system, and to redefine growth and economic prosperity altogether.

I know this is an intense thing to say, but please hear me out.

Many folks are and have been raising the crucial point that we can’t have infinite growth on a finite planet. There are many progressives who do not find this too controversial a statement – for many of us, it’s become a kind of common sense. For many of us, this becomes yet another reason among many why capitalism cannot continue. But there is an unspoken sentiment we continue to share, nonetheless, that while we may not want a capitalist economy, we still want to salvage some sort of an industrial way of life for ourselves. As Derrick Jensen has pointed out, when you begin to listen to the solutions to the ecological crisis being offered by folks across the political spectrum – it becomes clear that almost all of them agree on one thing: the industrial economy must be salvaged at any cost. The primary objective becomes the preservation of industrial civilization – not the preservation of a living, healing planet.

But look deeply into any of the processes that make industrialism possible, look deeply into the origins of any of its luxuries and commodities, and you will find –  literally – a trail of blood, and a ceaseless taking away from a planet that simply has almost nothing left to give.

We understand that we are in an ecological crisis.

But do we understand just how late the hour is?

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