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Wisconsin Wetlands Association: “No” to SB 368


Date: February 15, 2012

Wisconsin Wetlands Association Statement on Passage of SB 368

Today is a sad day for wetlands in Wisconsin. Our strong tradition of allowing economic development while also maintaining a strong commitment to protecting wetlands has just been overturned by the Senate. Once revered nationwide for our high standards, our policies are sinking to the level of so many other states where thousands of acres of wetlands are legally destroyed each year and mitigation rarely lives up to its promise. Only time will tell whether this law, once enacted, will lead to the run on wetlands we fear. The new framework, emphasizing wetland mitigation over avoidance and minimization of wetland impacts, certainly allows it. To those who applaud this bill as an economic engine for the state of Wisconsin we remind you that wetlands contribute billions in free services to Wisconsin’s economy every year. They protect us from floods, support our fish and wildlife, clean our water, and preserve the outdoor heritage Wisconsin residents hold so dear. If this law is enacted, we will no longer be able to count on the state to protect our wetlands. Our focus moving forward will be to work with local communities, and others, to help them capitalize on the economic benefits of protecting and restoring wetlands. For better or worse, wetland protection will now be in the hands of the people.

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From Endangered To Problem: Wisconsin Wolf Hunt To Begin Next Week, Minnesota Set To Host Its Own Hunt

from the Earth First! Journal Editorial Collective

Following the removal of wolves from the federal endangered species list last month, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has announced that some residents will be able to hunt “problem” wolves by next week.  In little over a month the grey wolf’s designation in Wisconsin has moved from endangered to problem. The demonization and execution of the species is set to follow because of the risk wolves pose to the “property” of large landowners.

Permits will be issued starting Friday for landowners who claim that wolves have killed their livestock.

Also on Friday, residents will be allowed to shoot, without a permit, any wolf attacking personal property.

It is anticipated that any property owner killing a wild wolf for attacking their personal property will be visited by bipedel friends of the wolves in the night and their personal property will be further and more completely destroyed in retaliation.

Minnesota has also promised a wolf hunt, although nothing is set up.

Gray Wolfs Delisted in Midwest, Wolf Kills to Begin Soon


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday that it was removing Endangered Species Act protections for the wolf in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan and portions of adjoining states.

After the announcement, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker ordered the state Department of Natural Resources to implement a state wolf management plan.

Wolves – which can travel up to 30 miles a day – have reached a population of about 800 in Wisconsin. That exceeds the state’s goal of 350. There are now more than 4,000 wolves in the Midwest. The region, once considered a bastion of wolf reintroduction and protection, may soon witness aerial wolf hunts and wolf seasons akin to the US West.

Under the state management plan, the DNR or those acting on its behalf will be able to kill “problem wolves.”

The Center for Biological Diversity said the decision was premature, and contended that wolves remained threatened by disease and human persecution. It criticized Minnesota for using a bounty system to kill problem wolves, and said there should be less emphasis on lethal controls. The group said it supports the government’s conclusion to retain protections for wolves in the Northeast.

As wolf numbers soared in recent years, the wolf became a lightning rod of controversy. Motorists bought Wisconsin license plates with its iconic image, but some deer hunters blamed wolves for reducing the deer population in parts of the north. At least seven wolves are believed to have been killed during the 2011 deer hunting season.

Despite their prevalence today, wolves were wiped off the state’s landscape between 1960 and 1974. In the mid-1970s, they began to migrate from Minnesota.